Photo Of The Week: Winter Harvest

Harvesting soybeans in late January or early February is not uncommon in Eastern North Carolina, particularly when it has been such a wet growing season. Planted in the late Spring and early Summer, the beans usually ripen by December but the relentless rain soaked the soil so thoroughly, it could not support the big harvesting machines.  The area finally got a week with no rain which flashed the green light for the long delayed harvest.

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Being based in Eastern North Carolina, I freelance a lot of rural and farm shots to argicultural concerns, Getty Images and the like.  As the old timers say, you dance with what brung ya, even if it’s a couple of months late.

Nikon D750, 24-120mm f/4 lens.

Thanks for dropping by and have a good week ahead.

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Photo Of The Week: Nor’Easter

The Sea Oats on the Barrier Dunes bend South as near gale force winds buffet the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

Windswept

Windswept

After multiple attempts to get the light on the ocean  where I wanted it, I finally came close to what I had visualized.  Of course, if you’re like me, you’re never satisfied and so you keep going back time and again for the perfect shot.  I’m not sure I can do any better than this.  But,  I’ll keep trying.

Particulars:  Nikon D750 Camera, 24-120 f/4 lens.   Shot with manual exposure, f/8 at 1/640, center weight metering, auto white balance, focal length 65mm.  No filters. I used a Slik tripod for the shot.

My thanks to those who stop by for a look. I appreciate your taking the time.  See you next time if not before.

Photo Of The Week:Boardwalk Empire

Boardwalk Empire.  Posted to Flickr November 12, 2016e

The walkway to the Gazebo at Duck, destroyed by Hurricane Irene more than five years ago, is back in business, though this was as far as I could get given the rather formidable chain blocking access.   I suspect the owners now rent it out.  The walkway connects to the Duck Boardwalk which runs along the coast of Currituck Sound for perhaps a mile or so. The late afternoon sun coupled with the perspective made for a rather interesting shot with a wide angle lens. So what has been a roosting place for Seagulls is now ready for humans, but as with most things now, it’s pay to play.  Nikon D800E Camera. 18-35 mm lens. Thanks for the look and have a great week ahead

 

Photo Of The Week: Back To the Birds

Big Snow storms in Eastern North Carolina are rare but this time around, the TV weather readers were pretty convincing with all their dopplers, models and statistics. Rain, they said, would turn to freezing rain as the temperature dropped.  Then sleet would pile on followed by snow.  In all, two to four inches would accumulate before the storm petered out.  Doesn’t sound like much but 4 inches here is a pretty big deal.  Snow removal here is the month of July.  I’m an aging radio news veteran from the days when news on the radio was actually quite the norm and I remember well the hype that kicks in when snow appears in a weather forecast, but this time, even I bought in.  I rushed out and bought five gallons of gasoline for our generator.  Freezing rain almost always means power outages in the rural area where I live.

The gasoline went in my truck.  The storm fizzled.  We had maybe a trace of snow and sleet but that was it.  No eye popping winter vistas.  So, I ventured down to my makeshift bird blind and spent the day with the birds.

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A little snow on the River Birch Tree would have been a nice enhancement but you dance with what brung ya.  A sack of sunflower seeds scatterred on the ground around the trees always works and soon the Cardinals and the Gold Finches et al were grabbing them and flying into the tree to crack the shells and munch away.  So I got some pretty decent shots.  One or two might find their way onto my web site.  Not bad for plan B.

Here’s the gear list on these shots:  Nikon D750, 70-300mm telephoto, Aperture Priority, Spot Metering, f/11, iso 200.  Slik tripod.  See you next time.

 

Photo of the Week: New Year’s Day

_dsc3717                                                           The moment of sunrise at Duck, North Carolina along the Outer Banks.

I’m beginning the new year with a new camera, the Nikon D750.  Well, it’s new to me anyway.   The 750 has been out a while but I wasn’t drawn to it initially because I didn’t think it was a true successor to the D700, which to this day I wish I had not sold.  I was chasing megapixels back in those days.  The D700 had 12.  The norm now is about double that but the D700 was still one of the best digital cameras Nikon has ever made. My humble opinion!  The 12 megapixels plus the full frame sensor made for incredible photographs. It captured the nuances of light uniquely.  It shined.  The 700 also had a pro body. It was a tank just like the Nikon film cameras.  And, like the old Nikon F’s,  it was just a still camera. No Video.  My kind of rig.  I’ve never shot one frame of video on any camera since and I wish I could still buy a camera without it.  Easy, I’m 71.  I’m old.  Still photography is still my only bag. Instead of the then new D750,  I bought the Nikon D600.  Within a year, it was back at Nikon getting a new shutter because of oil splatter.  They fixed it well and I put upwards of 75 thousand snaps on it before selling it this fall.  Why?  Well, Nikon was out with refurbished D750’s at a price I could not refuse. It was a bit faster and, better in low light.  Having used it for a month,  I have only a few gripes — apart from the fact that it is also a video camera.    First, it has the cheap Nikon eyepiece that is forever coming off.  Why Nikon cannot engineer its consumer cameras with the same round eyepiece it puts on its pro models is beyond me. Perhaps they are making too much money selling replacement eye  pieces.   I have to keep a supply on hand because they are always coming off the camera.  I wish it had an auto focus “On” button paired up with the AF/ AE (E for exposure) lock button on the back of the camera. True, there’s a work around using the “fn” button on the front, but it’s awkward.  And i wish Nikon would move either the ISO button or the Quality button to the top of the camera. I keep hitting the “quality” button when I go to change the ISO and I don’t realize it until I go to process the file and discover its not a RAW file.  One of the reasons I didn’t go for the 750 when it first came out was the pop out tilting monitor on the rear of the camera.  I was certain it would prove to be a weak point. I have been proven wrong.  I suffered a serious fall while on a photo outing in December.  I took a beating but the 750 which crashed to the pavement with me suffered nary a scratch. So with the few gripes I have listed, I love the camera.  The resolution,quality, clarity, sharpness, improved grip, weight  etc are off the charts. I’m looking forward to 2017 with it.  I will also watch my step.

My best wishes to all who venture here every so often for a joyous, healthy and prosperous 2017.  Blue Skies and Green lights everybody and thanks for the look.  See you next time.