Down East Sunrise

This sunrise shot on the beach along the Southern Bogue Banks of North Carolina is without question the best I have taken here since I first started coming down here ten years ago. Suffice to say, it was a keeper and I went to my usual lengths to make sure I held on to it.

If you’ve ever had a memory card get corrupted, and I have, you quickly learn not to take chances.  I learned a long time ago to always format memory cards in the camera I’m going to use.  It’s probably overkill, but I even go  a bit further.  I dedicate memory cards to specific cameras even though all are Nikons.  One set lives with the D750, another set with the D800e,  and a third with the D7100.  If you shoot with more than one brand of camera, and these days it’s not unusual to see a Sony or a Fujifilm in the same bag, do yourself a favor and always reformat the card for the specific camera you are going to use. There is no bigger bummer than to spend an entire day shooting and wind up with a corrupted card and nothing to show for the effort.

Thanks for the visit.  See you next time!

A Rant About Ready-made Frame Sizes

Looking to frame your digital photograph.

…….Don’t bother with all those ready-made frames you see in all the stores.  They won’t work for you unless you first crop your picture!  Read on.

 

It’s been 42 years since an Eastman Kodak Engineer named Steve Sasson invented the first digital camera;  and 18 years since Nikon came out with the first DSLR body designed from scratch by a single manufacturer: the 2.7 megapixel D1. Now digital cameras are everywhere from phones to drones,  yet for some reason the people who make all those frames you see at the big drugstores, craft stores, big box stores, etc…have never adopted digital photograph frame sizes.  They still base all of their frames on photograph sizes from the film era; 8 X10 or 11X14. Even a lot of the digital photo organizer software out there still offer only the standard analog photo print sizes that were set way back in the days of the Kodak Instamatic.  It forces you to  crop every digital photo you print so it will fit into those outdated,  ready-made frames you find on the store shelves. You’ll have to go online to find photo labs that will print digital sized photographs. Be sure to search for  “digital sizes” because they also print the old film sizes.

Once you do that, you’ll have, for example, a 12 X 16 print instead of a cropped 11 X 14 but you’ll have to have it custom framed or frame it yourself because the ready-made frames won’t fit. You’d think, after 18 years of commercial digital photography, the ready-made frame business would have caught on.  You’d think!

Thanks for the read, and look. See you next time. Oh, and have a great Holiday Weekend.

The Solace Of Isolation

My sense is that all living things crave it,  the solace of isolation. When I was working, it was often expressed as “Quality Quiet Time;” a chance  to escape the spotlight of your own circumstance. Edward Hopper’s “Automat” conveys that message to me as does the scene above.  There wasn’t another sea gull within sight when I came upon this guy, soaking up the warmth of the coming dawn, a calm, peaceful moment, alone with himself.

This lady above had given me a slight nod when she walked by with her dog, no doubt a daily ritual.  When I framed the shot, my thoughts went to Hopper, Wyeth and Warhol.  I grew up in a family of painters.  I was told once that people who can’t paint go into photography.   I couldn’t so i did.  Even so,  I think the rub-off has served me well.  I was still roaming the beach, no doubt looking for my own solace, when she returned; her Lab glistening from a  splash in the ocean.  We struck up a conversation.  She and her husband had just relocated from up north and were refurbishing a house a few blocks off the beach.  It reinforced my belief that people who come to the beach,  regardless of their station in life, all have the civility of a small town.  I suppose the moral of the morning was, place no trust in appearances.  Thanks for the look and have a good week.  See you next time.

 

Quiet Shadows; Subtle Abstraction; Finding pleasure in the Ordinary

Photography is very much an individual piece of business.   For many of us who are drawn to it,  we each mine our own little niche. For me it is the beach in the off season. The solace of isolation it offers brings me peace that no other place does.  When I plan a visit, fortunately a rather short drive for me.  I feel the vertigo of anticipation even though I have visited thousands of times over my 72 years.

There are usually a few fellow travelers out and about  when I am, all no doubt lured by the perfume of the slightly salty air that shows all who visit the same affection but who, I suspect, are primarily charmed by the solace  that allows us to get reacquainted with ourselves.  The constant rhythm of the ocean, the soft rush of the wind and, of course, the constantly changing dance of the sky,  all combine to reawaken one’s spirits.  As we age, I think we tend to start piling more and more of life into a box of sameness.  Our senses dull and more of the world becomes mundane, ordinary.  It’s a very slippery slope and one which photography helps me avoid.  See you next time.

The Last Weekend Before The Great Migration

It was my last chance to shoot some pictures on a vacant beach and my back had finally decided to cooperate, agreeing to get itself back in sync.  I was on the beach road by 4AM and on the point at Lands End within a hour.  My timing could not have been better.  The tidal flats were laid out in front of me as the dawn reached its zenith.  I got low, stretched out the screen on the D800E allowing me the live view you see above.  The fellow dawn watchers far up the beach were a bonus.  They gave the scene scale.

The forecast had been partly sunny meaning a few clouds and that is exactly how it was.  A perfect morning for shooting a sunrise scene.  I used my usual formula” Spot Metering taking the exposure reading away from the sun and locking the exposure, iso 400, manual exposure, and an aperture of f/16.  I took three shots.  This one utilized a # 6 graduated neutral density filter shade the glaring sun while leaving the ocean and beach in natural light.  I don’t use this filter much but it was the right choice for this situation.  Certainly worth having one in your bag.

In addition to the D800E, I was carrying my D750 fitted with a 70-300mm Nikkor lens.  If you have two DSLR’s, I suggest fitting one with the requisite wide angle and a telephoto on the second. You never know what will come up without warning like the council of shore birds further up the beach which decided to head south.   I grabbed the 750 and caught them in the southeast sky.  complimenting that marvelous pink cloud that looked like the famous Nike Swoosh (trademark).  In all that morning, I grabbed more than 140 keepers.  I’ll share more with you over the coming weeks and leave the beach to the refugees from the North who need more Vitamin D than I.  Have a great holiday weekend everybody.

An Atlantic Dawn

Atlantic Dawn I

 

Atlantic Dawn II

A couple of pre-sunrise shots taken at Southern Shores, North Carolina.  I didn’t have far to walk to the beach so when I saw the cloudy sky, I grabbed my bag and headed out.   These scenes come early so if you have trouble getting out of bed, you will miss them.   Be there and you’ll be rewarded with some fabulous sky colors.  These two shots were taken on the same morning.  A complete makeover that occurred within just a few minutes before sunrise.  Both shots were handheld. The second a tad longer exposure.  Both shot with a Nikon D800e camera and an 18-35 Nikkor lens.  If you’re heading for a beach this spring or summer, take along an alarm clock.  It’s worth the agony of getting up early.  Have a good week.  See you next time.

Photo Of The Week: Autumn On The Outer Banks

Serenity  Posted to Flickr october 28, 2016

I’ve always been convinced that Autumn and Winter are the best seasons for grabbing a dynamic sunrise or sunset shot along the coast.  I’m no weather guru but it just seems the cooler temperatures seem to generate more clouds which, when struck, by the light of the rising sun, make for  a spectacular scene.  This is the moment of Sunrise along the Outer Banks of North Carolina somewhere between Kitty Hawk and Southern Shores.  No filters. Nikon D800E Camera with an 18mm lens. ISO 400, Manual exposure, center weight metering, f/9, 1/320th of a second.  Thanks for your visit and have a great week ahead.