Photo Of The Week: Up Close & Personal

A few splotches of color returned to the landscape this week. Not that we’ve been living in a totally drab world; the Sasanquas and Camellias have been showing their glory  since late October.  Now the Daffodils and Japanese Quince have joined the chorus.

The occasion prompted some lens changes.  The 60 mm and 105 mm macro lenses were clicked into place as I waded into the Daffodil patch and the huge, very prickly Japanese Quince.   It was a nice preview of what’s to come in a few months.  Thanks for the look and have a good week ahead. _dsc8649_dsc8592-1

Photo Of The Week: Dogwood Days

_DSC5167

The wild  Dogwood Trees went from small buds to full fledged blooms in a couple of days.  Our farm here in Eastern North Carolina is thick with them; filling the sky with blooms, like large snow flakes on a blue sky day.   One of the larger trees covers a deck that is perhaps three to four feet off the ground.  It affords an interesting perspective of the blooms high up in the tree.  I focused on the closest bloom at f/6 throwing everything distant into a soft blur; a quick and easy composition of a scene that only comes once a year.  Thanks for the look and have a good week.

Photo Of The Week: Azaleas, Finally!

_DSC4273-1

Our azaleas have been through the wringer this year.  The mild winter, down here a lot of people called it “the phony winter,” brought out the blooms several times in January and again in February only to have cold temperatures kill them off.  Now, it seems spring has finally taken hold, albeit a week early.  March is busting out all over.  These big red formosas seemed to be partying in the sunshine with the still blooming camellias providing some nice bokeh backup.  Floral shots are not on everyone’s hit parade.  Landscapes usually win, but I was so glad to see these, I decided to give them their “15 minutes of fame.”  Enjoy and have a great week.

Photo Of The Day: Infatuation

08 28 15_3179_edited-1-1

Its been a long time since I spent an afternoon tracking butterflies.  For one thing, we haven’t had that many fluttering around the farm until now.  Perhaps they decided to check out some other fields before gracing ours. August was the charm.  We’ve seen flocks of them cruising around the blooms.  This one is romancing one of the Mexican Petunias.  I used the Nikon D7100 with the 18-200 mm lens handheld with no tripod.  I got lucky.  Thanks for the visit and have a great week.

Photo Of The Day: Dogwoods In The Wild

FAA

I spent the better part of a day in a section of the farm I call Dogwood Dell.  About a dozen wild Dogwoods thrive there under towering Lob Lolly Pines feeding on the acid earth which is also home to ancient Azaleas and Camellias.  The late afternoon sun finds its way into the Dell and I’ve found that late afternoon is the best time for shooting.  This view was taken into the sun using a Nikon D800E camera with a 24-120 mm f/4 lens which pretty much lives on the camera.  I think it a good marriage.  I usually take several shots of scenes like this running through different ranges of ISO.   On this one, I settled on an ISO of 400. I found the soft light on the fragile blooms and the warmer light in the bokeh rather pleasing.  I put this shot on my Fine Art America site (click on John Harding Art Prints in the upper right)  and immediately got several dozen hits and one sale of a rather large print so it was a day well spent.  Have a great Sunday everybody and thanks for the look.

 

Photo Of The Day: Pear Flowers at Dawn

G1105.edited_edited-1  Bradford Pear Blooms glow in the dawn light here on the farm. Nikon D700/ 24-120mm f/4 lens.

I was all set to trade my D700 on the new Nikon Df Camera.  As you might expect, the Df with its very strong  retro film camera look appeals to ancients  like me.  It has a very strong resemblance to the old Nikon FM which was my first 35mm Nikon.   And the Df  boasts a 16 MP sensor whereas the D700 packs only 12. But before I got on the phone to my guy at B and H in New York to do the deed, I took a look back at some of the D 700 images from the past few years and I could not sell the camera.  It has nowhere near the resolution of the D800, D600 or probably even the Df, but there is just something about the light it captures.  The 700 stays.  I have a friend in Australia who’s on old Pro and he says the D700 is the best Studio Camera Nikon has ever made.  I defer to him on that.  I just know I could not sell it.  By the way, I could never bring myself to sell the FM either.

Thanks for the visit and have a great evening.