Photo Of The Week: November In The Wetlands

Autumn in the Wetlands

Autumn in the Wetlands

It’s probably not on any government map as an official,”Wetlands,” probably because it’s not very large; maybe 50 to 75 yards wide and a mile or thereabouts long.  Whatever, it’s on our farm and  it’s home to several families of Beavers, goodness knows how many Canada Geese,  Mallards and Wood Ducks, not to mention the Deer, Bears, Foxes and other forest critters who visit daily for a drink of water or to munch on some tasty leaves and berries.  We don’t permit any hunting in our wetlands and we leave the perimeter untouched so as to isolate it and make access difficult for humans.  I seldom venture there now except in the fall when navigating the vines, thorns  and overgrowth has died down to the point where one can gain access without getting hopelessly entangled in the thicket.  This past week, I took the plunge,  fitted out with hip boots and a very thick, thorn proof jacket.  It’s been quite dry here since Hurricane Matthew blasted through dumping well over a foot and half of rain so the slog for photos wasn’t too difficult for these old bones.  My photo gear for this little adventure was my trusty Nikon D7100 small sensor camera and a Sigma 10-20mm wide angle zoom. I leave my expensive full frame cameras in the bag when I venture into water either here on the farm or at the ocean front.   Why chance it when the D7100 will do the job.

It was well worth the trip.  I think the late afternoon shots on a partly cloudy, blue sky day captured both the isolation and the wildness of the area.  The shot above was taken from the North side of the Wetlands about 100 yards  East of the largest Beaver Pond with the Sigma dialed in at 10mm with a slight crop in post.  As is my usual practice when shooting into the sun, I used the manual setting and spot metering, taking my reading in the blue sky to the right away from the sun, locking the exposure ,then recomposing and shooting. The sun star, of course, is inherent at f/22.  As for the ISO, suffice to say I usually shoot at several different settings and just pick what I think is best.  The winner here , at least to my eye, was ISO 400.

A camera change for me.  I’m trading in my Nikon D600 in favor of a refurbished Nikon D750.  I bought the D600 new when it came out some years ago, and as you might know, the model was plagued with shutter oil splatter on the sensor requiring constant cleaning of the sensor.  Nikon finally agreed to a recall and replaced the shutter free of charge and the camera has given great service ever since. I opted for the D750 because It’s faster, has a tilt screen, 51 focus points, high ISO range,  among other improvements.  Prior to the D600, every digital camera I have ever bought from Nikon has been a refurbished model and I have never had the first problem. I’ve always heard that unlike  Nikon’s random assembly line checks of new models,  each of the company’s refurbished models is gone over by by a Nikon Tech and set to factory specs before it is cleared for sale.  I’ll let you know how the refurbished D750 measures up in a future post. As always, thanks for the read.  See you next time.

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Photo Of The Day: Return Engagement

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Sunrise along the Southern Outer Banks.

Ever wonder just how many times you have snapped the shutter on your camera? If you shoot in the jpeg format, each picture you shoot has the total number of  shutter activations included in the exif data that accompanies each picture.  Scroll down toward the bottom of the list and you will see it.   I shoot in the RAW format and when I convert it to jpeg for printing or posting, it’s not included in the exif data.  Yesterday I snapped one jpeg picture on each camera so I could find out just where I was shutter-wise.   My trusty D600 led the pack with more than 22,000 shutter snaps.  The D800e had only just over above 6 thousand and the D7100 just over 12 thousand.  In truth the D600 really only has about 12-15 thousand snaps on it.  The camera had a bug in the shutter that splattered little drops of oil on the sensor.  Nikon recalled it and installed a brand new, improved shutter which essentially made the D600 a D610.  What they didn’t do is rotate the number of shutter snaps back to 0 so,  the exif data shows 22 thousand plus. I doubt I ever swap it in on a newer model.  The shutter is tested to 150,000 activations.  I’m now 70.  I suspect I’ll wear out before the shutter does.

Have a great Sunday.  See you next time.

Photo Of The Day: Spring Salsa

FAA Hard as it is to tear myself away from the Sunday New York Times, my easy chair and a cup of Chock Full Of Nuts Coffee,   I was determined to keep to my self imposed vow to stick to my blog schedule,  so here you go.     I shot this just the other day in some Oscar  winning light that had penetrated just about every nook and cranny of the camellia beds here on the farm.  The blooms, and there are hundreds, had the look of a sizzling cauldron of color.  Lord have mercy it was Kodachome reincarnated;  pushing all of  my painter wanna-be buttons.  Put on your shades  and click on the photograph to get the “Full Monty”!

I shot this with a Nikon D7100 and the workhorse 18-200mm DX lens.  Have a great Sunday evening and thanks for the look.

Photo Of The Day: Spring

G.1085.edited_edited-1 An April  Sunrise under Bradford Pear Trees.  No Filters. The Sun Star is automatic at f/22.  Spot metering on sunrises.  I always take a reading on the sky away from the sun.   Works every time.

Nikon D600/ 18-35 mm

There’s word that Nikon has a new DX (Small Sensor) Pro level  DSLR in the works.  Called the D9300, it supposedly will replace the old D300S at the top of the Small Sensor food chain.  Lots of wildlife shooters have been waiting a long time for a D300 replacement. The small sensor is ideal for wildlife photography, ie bird photography because of the 1.5 crop factor on full frame lenses.  Nothing on pricing.  Knowing Nikon, I’d guess it will fall between the full frame D610 and the D800.  As for specs, I’d guess 8 frames a second and a larger buffer than the D7100.  If you are wedded to the Nikon System via lenses etc….The D7100 would probably be a cheaper way to go.  The only negative I have about mine is the buffer.  I mitigated that to a large extent by using a very fast SD card.  Stay Tuned.  Thanks for the visit and have a great evening.