Photo Of The Week: Up Close & Personal

A few splotches of color returned to the landscape this week. Not that we’ve been living in a totally drab world; the Sasanquas and Camellias have been showing their glory  since late October.  Now the Daffodils and Japanese Quince have joined the chorus.

The occasion prompted some lens changes.  The 60 mm and 105 mm macro lenses were clicked into place as I waded into the Daffodil patch and the huge, very prickly Japanese Quince.   It was a nice preview of what’s to come in a few months.  Thanks for the look and have a good week ahead. _dsc8649_dsc8592-1

Photo Of The Week:Boardwalk Empire

Boardwalk Empire.  Posted to Flickr November 12, 2016e

The walkway to the Gazebo at Duck, destroyed by Hurricane Irene more than five years ago, is back in business, though this was as far as I could get given the rather formidable chain blocking access.   I suspect the owners now rent it out.  The walkway connects to the Duck Boardwalk which runs along the coast of Currituck Sound for perhaps a mile or so. The late afternoon sun coupled with the perspective made for a rather interesting shot with a wide angle lens. So what has been a roosting place for Seagulls is now ready for humans, but as with most things now, it’s pay to play.  Nikon D800E Camera. 18-35 mm lens. Thanks for the look and have a great week ahead

 

Photo Of The Week: Back To the Birds

Big Snow storms in Eastern North Carolina are rare but this time around, the TV weather readers were pretty convincing with all their dopplers, models and statistics. Rain, they said, would turn to freezing rain as the temperature dropped.  Then sleet would pile on followed by snow.  In all, two to four inches would accumulate before the storm petered out.  Doesn’t sound like much but 4 inches here is a pretty big deal.  Snow removal here is the month of July.  I’m an aging radio news veteran from the days when news on the radio was actually quite the norm and I remember well the hype that kicks in when snow appears in a weather forecast, but this time, even I bought in.  I rushed out and bought five gallons of gasoline for our generator.  Freezing rain almost always means power outages in the rural area where I live.

The gasoline went in my truck.  The storm fizzled.  We had maybe a trace of snow and sleet but that was it.  No eye popping winter vistas.  So, I ventured down to my makeshift bird blind and spent the day with the birds.

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A little snow on the River Birch Tree would have been a nice enhancement but you dance with what brung ya.  A sack of sunflower seeds scatterred on the ground around the trees always works and soon the Cardinals and the Gold Finches et al were grabbing them and flying into the tree to crack the shells and munch away.  So I got some pretty decent shots.  One or two might find their way onto my web site.  Not bad for plan B.

Here’s the gear list on these shots:  Nikon D750, 70-300mm telephoto, Aperture Priority, Spot Metering, f/11, iso 200.  Slik tripod.  See you next time.

 

Photo of the Week: New Year’s Day

_dsc3717                                                           The moment of sunrise at Duck, North Carolina along the Outer Banks.

I’m beginning the new year with a new camera, the Nikon D750.  Well, it’s new to me anyway.   The 750 has been out a while but I wasn’t drawn to it initially because I didn’t think it was a true successor to the D700, which to this day I wish I had not sold.  I was chasing megapixels back in those days.  The D700 had 12.  The norm now is about double that but the D700 was still one of the best digital cameras Nikon has ever made. My humble opinion!  The 12 megapixels plus the full frame sensor made for incredible photographs. It captured the nuances of light uniquely.  It shined.  The 700 also had a pro body. It was a tank just like the Nikon film cameras.  And, like the old Nikon F’s,  it was just a still camera. No Video.  My kind of rig.  I’ve never shot one frame of video on any camera since and I wish I could still buy a camera without it.  Easy, I’m 71.  I’m old.  Still photography is still my only bag. Instead of the then new D750,  I bought the Nikon D600.  Within a year, it was back at Nikon getting a new shutter because of oil splatter.  They fixed it well and I put upwards of 75 thousand snaps on it before selling it this fall.  Why?  Well, Nikon was out with refurbished D750’s at a price I could not refuse. It was a bit faster and, better in low light.  Having used it for a month,  I have only a few gripes — apart from the fact that it is also a video camera.    First, it has the cheap Nikon eyepiece that is forever coming off.  Why Nikon cannot engineer its consumer cameras with the same round eyepiece it puts on its pro models is beyond me. Perhaps they are making too much money selling replacement eye  pieces.   I have to keep a supply on hand because they are always coming off the camera.  I wish it had an auto focus “On” button paired up with the AF/ AE (E for exposure) lock button on the back of the camera. True, there’s a work around using the “fn” button on the front, but it’s awkward.  And i wish Nikon would move either the ISO button or the Quality button to the top of the camera. I keep hitting the “quality” button when I go to change the ISO and I don’t realize it until I go to process the file and discover its not a RAW file.  One of the reasons I didn’t go for the 750 when it first came out was the pop out tilting monitor on the rear of the camera.  I was certain it would prove to be a weak point. I have been proven wrong.  I suffered a serious fall while on a photo outing in December.  I took a beating but the 750 which crashed to the pavement with me suffered nary a scratch. So with the few gripes I have listed, I love the camera.  The resolution,quality, clarity, sharpness, improved grip, weight  etc are off the charts. I’m looking forward to 2017 with it.  I will also watch my step.

My best wishes to all who venture here every so often for a joyous, healthy and prosperous 2017.  Blue Skies and Green lights everybody and thanks for the look.  See you next time.

Photo Of The Week: Christmas Eve Sunrise

Blogged December 25, 2016

Sunrise December 24, 2016

 

For several years running,  the Christmas day sunrise has been nothing short of spectacular here, to the point of becoming an almost spiritual thing. Not This year.  We were greeted this morning with an overcast sky and patches of misty rain, the result of a warm front that marched through late yesterday and overnight.  But the Christmas weekend was not a total washout.. Christmas Eve morning  was a keeper. With the colder air, the scene could be from October.  There were  just enough clouds to reflect the warm morning light. I had seen the clouds moving in over the tall lob lolly pines from my kitchen window and grabbed my camera.  No filters. Nikon D750 fitted with a 24-120mm f/4 lens. Iso 400, custom white balance, though Automatic on the 750 is quite good. Manual exposure. Spot metering. 1/125th of a second at f/22 which explains the slight flare to the sun. Best wishes to all for a great holiday and a safe and prosperous 2017.

Photo Of The Week: Flags for the Scouts

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This shot of the Stars and Stripes and the State Flag of North Carolina flying on the barrier dunes along the Outer Banks at Sunset was chosen by the Eastern Council of the Boy Scouts of America to be awarded to  selected friends of Scouting for their outstanding support.  Exquisitely matted and framed by Shenandoah Printing and Graphics of Greenville, North Carolina, it is a most impressive presentation.  It was a real honor for the Scouts to select my shot.  I cannot think of a better organization to be associated with.  Thanks for the look.  See you soon.

Photo Of The Day: Stalking The Sky

Stalking the sky.  Posted to flickr November 28, 2016

Stalking the Sky

One of the oldest of Photography “Rules”  is in play here.  I say “Rules” because, of course, there are no rules ,and those that have been passed down come with the caveat,  “made to be broken.”   Over the years though, I’ve found this one is worth remembering: when all else fails, get low!   As it was, this was no shot at all when I first saw it.  The distant dark tree line swallowed the scene. But by getting low, the high grass stalks met that incredible orange of the dawn sky and bingo, a scene worth capturing.  I thought it was a rather pleasing shot.  So did my followers on flickr.  It got a lot of hits and faves and so forth.  I decided to put it on my web site and sold a small print the first day.  So, a worthwhile photography  that all came about because I “went low.”   Mind you, “getting low” is not something I do much of these days.  At my age, getting low is one thing, getting back vertical is quite another,  but this shot made even the complaining knees worth it.  Nikon D800E. 18-35mm lens.  Thanks for the look and have a great week.