Early Birds

They seemed to know something was coming so they were out early on seed patrol before the wind kicked up.  So was I in my makeshift bird blind with the Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6 at the ready.

This Common Grackle appeared to be waiting for his mate.  A large bronzed black bird with a large tail, long legs and an iridescent bluish glow on his head when the light is at the right angle, the smaller birds give him a wide birth.

Just getting a shot of these Carolina Chickadees is a challenge.  Very quick, flighty little birds, they grab a spot in a nearby tree, dart down to pick up a seed then fly back to almost exact same spot in the tree to break the shell and have a snack.  The trick is to focus on the bird when he first lands in the tree then hold the exposure and wait for him to return.  He almost always will.

The Chipping Sparrows strike me as very quiet, patient little birds who perch and watch for a while before going for a seed.  Then they’ll come back to the tree, hold the seed under a foot and pop it open with their bill.  After a snack, they’ll just perch and watch the action for a while.  Easy to get a shot of, we have lots of them here.

Another rather patient bird, the Dark Eyed Junkos are another of the year round residents here. I’ve always wondered why so many  people in Eastern North Carolina call them snow birds because we get so little snow every year.  I suppose it’s because, when it does snow, their dark feathers make them easy to spot.

The wind quickly began picking up as the Nor’easter took hold, the birds took cover and I headed for the house.  By late morning, the wind was clocking at 45 to 50 miles an hour as the storm began its trek up the eastern seaboard. Have a good week.  See you next time.

Photo Of The Week: Nor’Easter

The Sea Oats on the Barrier Dunes bend South as near gale force winds buffet the Outer Banks of North Carolina.



After multiple attempts to get the light on the ocean  where I wanted it, I finally came close to what I had visualized.  Of course, if you’re like me, you’re never satisfied and so you keep going back time and again for the perfect shot.  I’m not sure I can do any better than this.  But,  I’ll keep trying.

Particulars:  Nikon D750 Camera, 24-120 f/4 lens.   Shot with manual exposure, f/8 at 1/640, center weight metering, auto white balance, focal length 65mm.  No filters. I used a Slik tripod for the shot.

My thanks to those who stop by for a look. I appreciate your taking the time.  See you next time if not before.

Photo of The Week: Big Blow


I’m guessing the wind was gusting up to 50 mph.  I was crouched on top of the barrier dunes at Southern Shores, North Carolina and even with my tripod planted in the sand, it was hard to keep the camera steady.  The sea oats  and  the ocean tell the story.  This was the first Tropical Storm/ Hurricane I had ridden out on the coast since the 70’s.  It was a sobering experience.  Nikon D3X  24mm lens.   Have  a good week and thanks for the look.



Photo Of The Day: Storm Front

361a.edited_edited-1The Outer Banks gets its share of nasty weather.  This shot followed one of the frequent Nor’easters.  Nikon D700 with an 18-35mm lens.  Right now we’re preparing for a nasty storm approaching from the West North West so this will be a short post.  Thanks as always for your visit and have a great evening.

Run and Hide


The beach at Southern Shores as seen from the top of the barrier dunes.  A Nor’easter  is moving northward up the coast packing lots of rain, wind and high surf.  Time to hunker down.  Have a great evening and thanks for the visit.

Beach Erosion


Beach erosion is a fact of life on the Outer Banks.   Nor’easters and Hurricanes take their toll.   This is a shot of the barrier dune line  at Southern Shores, North Carolina the day after Hurricane Irene pounded the coast in late August of 2011.   What the storms take away, they also put back.  Miles down the coast, inlets are routinely  filled in and new ones created.    Despite man’s best efforts to rebuild beaches, in the end Mother Nature always wins.  Click on the photograph for a larger view.   Thanks for the look.  Have a great evening and a great weekend.