The Solace Of Isolation

My sense is that all living things crave it,  the solace of isolation. When I was working, it was often expressed as “Quality Quiet Time;” a chance  to escape the spotlight of your own circumstance. Edward Hopper’s “Automat” conveys that message to me as does the scene above.  There wasn’t another sea gull within sight when I came upon this guy, soaking up the warmth of the coming dawn, a calm, peaceful moment, alone with himself.

This lady above had given me a slight nod when she walked by with her dog, no doubt a daily ritual.  When I framed the shot, my thoughts went to Hopper, Wyeth and Warhol.  I grew up in a family of painters.  I was told once that people who can’t paint go into photography.   I couldn’t so i did.  Even so,  I think the rub-off has served me well.  I was still roaming the beach, no doubt looking for my own solace, when she returned; her Lab glistening from a  splash in the ocean.  We struck up a conversation.  She and her husband had just relocated from up north and were refurbishing a house a few blocks off the beach.  It reinforced my belief that people who come to the beach,  regardless of their station in life, all have the civility of a small town.  I suppose the moral of the morning was, place no trust in appearances.  Thanks for the look and have a good week.  See you next time.

 

Quiet Shadows; Subtle Abstraction; Finding pleasure in the Ordinary

Photography is very much an individual piece of business.   For many of us who are drawn to it,  we each mine our own little niche. For me it is the beach in the off season. The solace of isolation it offers brings me peace that no other place does.  When I plan a visit, fortunately a rather short drive for me.  I feel the vertigo of anticipation even though I have visited thousands of times over my 72 years.

There are usually a few fellow travelers out and about  when I am, all no doubt lured by the perfume of the slightly salty air that shows all who visit the same affection but who, I suspect, are primarily charmed by the solace  that allows us to get reacquainted with ourselves.  The constant rhythm of the ocean, the soft rush of the wind and, of course, the constantly changing dance of the sky,  all combine to reawaken one’s spirits.  As we age, I think we tend to start piling more and more of life into a box of sameness.  Our senses dull and more of the world becomes mundane, ordinary.  It’s a very slippery slope and one which photography helps me avoid.  See you next time.