Does “Goat’s Foot” have anything to do with it?

I think it was Bob Dylan who said “If I had known how long I was going to be around, I’d have taken better care of myself.”  Amen to that! If you’re going to roam around with cameras and camera bags around your neck, it sorta helps if you are in shape.  And at 73, I’m quickly finding out I am not.  Arthritis is loudly proclaiming itself to be in control  to the point of preventing me from straightening my right leg.  I’d been hobbling around popping ibuprofen tablets for a month or so when I finally decided it would be a good idea to finally find out if something was structurally wrong or if it was just arthritis.  A raft of X-rays confirmed arthritis to be in control of my knee joint.  A shot of cortisone got me back in the game. “Might fix it or it might not,” my doctor said, “But for now, you’re good to go.”  I’ll take what I can get.

I’d been wanting to get out into the field to grab a few shots of the sunrise now that the annual invasion of wild, reddish sour grass has taken over the fields.  It provides a smidgen of foreground interest in what would otherwise be a pretty empty scene. 

Nikon D750 Camera. Nikkor 24-120mm lens set at 24mm.

Somebody told me that the red grass is a variety of Bermuda Sorrel which supposedly is edible. An acid provides the sour taste.  Perhaps that’s why goats like to graze on it which tagged the grass with the name,  “Goat’s Foot.”   Not too appetizing, huh.  But given my state of mobility, I wondered if old goats develop arthritic knees.  And if not, does grazing on sour grass have something to do with it?   I’ll take my chances with the cortisone.  Thanks for the look and have a good week ahead.  See you next time.

Sour Grass

Sour Grass as it is more widely known, is actually Wild Sorrel; a short lived perennial that dots fields and open spaces every Spring along the Eastern United States.  Distinguished by its reddish pink color, it is edible to a point point with an acidic, sour taste.  It offers a marvelous foreground enhancement when photographing otherwise barren fields prior to Spring planting.

Shot with a Nikon D800E Camera using an 18mm Nikkor Lens,  I used my usual set up for sunrise photography: Manual program, Spot metering, taking my exposure reading away from the Sun in the blue sky, f/22 for 1/320th of a second, Auto White Balance, ISO 400. No Filters.  I shoot everything in Nikon’s RAW Format (NEF) and I use Photoshop Elements to convert the image to jpeg.  Ah yes, I also use a tripod for all landscape shots: A SLIK Pro 5000X.  Thank you for the look-in and have a great week.

Photo Of The Week: Sourgrass

Blogged

It dots the fields in Eastern North Carolina every spring.  It’s sourgrass, a decidedly red, wild grass.  Stick a sprig between your teeth and you’ll think you are sucking on a very potent sour ball.  Highly photogenic, the bright red sour grass gives a nice foreground for otherwise blah landscape shots of the field at sunrise.  Spot Metering, ISO 400, f/22 using a Nikon 18-35mm lens on a D800E camera. Click on the photo for a larger view and thanks for the look.