Back To the Future

Several years ago, I sold my Nikon D 700 camera to buy its successor, the D 750. I was caught up in the megapixel race in those days. The 700 had just over 12, the 750 doubled that to just over 24. It is a wonderful camera. Overall, one of the best I’ve ever owned but I missed the 700. It was a tank, like Nikon’s legendary film cameras: magnesium body, water resistant, dust resistant, and it was fast: 8 frames per second. But what I missed most was its ability to capture the subtle phasing of tones in low light capabilities.  Those megapixels are like little stars. It’s the space around them that makes them beautiful. The full frame D 700 had lots of space around its pixels.  It’s what gave it those marvelous low light capabilities.  I went through my archives like someone flipping through the family scrapbook, looking at the thousands of shots I had taken with the D700. Landscapes, birds, flowers. I missed its subtlety.

I’d think of those every time I scrolled through the used camera offerings at B and H in New York, or MPB or Adorama or the other big dealers. Every now and then one would pop up and tug at my sleeve. Nah, I would think; I’m camera poor and why buy someone elses problem. Then yesterday afternoon, I was scrolling through the used digital camera offerings at B and H and there it was, a D 700 in like new condition with only 8 thousand shutter snaps. And the price was right. I pulled the trigger. It will arrive this coming Wednesday. I hope the weather clears by then because we are going to have a grand reunion. Thanks for the visit. See you next time.

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Photo Of The Day: Infatuation

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Its been a long time since I spent an afternoon tracking butterflies.  For one thing, we haven’t had that many fluttering around the farm until now.  Perhaps they decided to check out some other fields before gracing ours. August was the charm.  We’ve seen flocks of them cruising around the blooms.  This one is romancing one of the Mexican Petunias.  I used the Nikon D7100 with the 18-200 mm lens handheld with no tripod.  I got lucky.  Thanks for the visit and have a great week.

Photo Of The Day: Carolina Chickadee

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For the longest time, we had very few birds fluttering around here then when the rare snow smothered everything, they all came out looking for yummy black oil sunflower seeds.  This little Carolina Chickadee is banging away at his while holding it against a limb.  I fired off about 10 shots with my D3X and managed to get several keepers.  I’ve found the easiest way to get a shot of these very fast little birds is to wait until after they crack their seed and eat it.  They will always look up and pause for a nanosecond before darting back to the ground to pick up another one. Click on the photo for the large view.

Thanks for the visit and have a great week ahead.

 

Photo Of The Day: Iced In Junko

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Another shot from the recent ice storm here.  This Dark Eyed Junko was waiting to dart down to the ground below this River Birch Tree where I had spread a healthy amount of  black oiled sunflower seeds.  I was maybe 10 feet away in a makeshift bird blind with a Nikon D7100 fitted with a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G lens.  I use the D7100 for most bird photography I do because of the crop factor involved in using a full frame lens on the small sensor camera. I’ve tried the Nikon 18-300mm but find the 70-300 far sharper.

The ice lingered for about a day until warmer temperatures brought more rain. What the Northeast has gotten in snow, we have gotten in rain. Eastern North Carolina to the coast is a virtual swamp because of the nonstop rain so other than during the ice event, I haven’t been out much working instead on a backlog of images.  I’m hoping for a dry spring but it seems unlikely. Thanks for the look and have a good week.